CDPUG BlogSphere

News for Digital Designer and Members and Friends of the Cleveland Digital Publishing Users Group

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Here’s a useful addition to your design arsenal: 64 textured papers, each one a 2100 x 1500 pixel image suitable for printing. Company Folders provides these images so you can see what your designs might look like on their folder stock — but you can use them as backgrounds or texture maps for any project!

Some of my favorites are Eco Kraft, Jute Vellum, 10 colors of Linen, and 8 colors of Felt. Their website shows previews of each paper, so you can decide whether you think they’re worth downloading.

Here you can download professional, full-size photographs of the 64 high quality paper stocks we offer.

  • Get a basic sense of the look and texture of each stock in Photoshop, Illustrator, etc.
  • Add them to die-cut templates to see how your printed design will look on a particular stock
  • Use them in mockup templates to demonstrate your final product to others

Download all images here:

http://www.companyfolders.com/design/paper-textures?mc_cid=bd432b7df9&mc_eid=ce995397fb

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This time we have something a little different, a book from Joe Kissell called Are Your Bits Flipped? It’s not a classic Take Control book of steps and screenshots, instead taking a conversational approach to the general topic of overcoming tech misconceptions.

Just as a single “flipped bit” in a piece of computer code can bring an otherwise reliable app crashing to a halt, a single misconception in your understanding of personal computing technology can cause all manner of problems — including lost data, wasted time, and constant frustration as you live and work in today’s increasingly digital world. In this unique title from Take Control, which is packed with little-known facts and debunked beliefs, tech expert Joe Kissell untangles common confusions surrounding the high-tech products and services we all rely on every day.

By eliminating your tech misconceptions, you’ll:

  • Avoid common errors that waste precious time or result in data loss.
  • Make decisions based on an accurate understanding of how things work.
  • Find yourself asking for — or paying for! — computer help less often.
  • Have clear explanations on hand when others ask you for help.
  • Better understand tech topics in the headlines — encryption, passwords, privacy, and more.
  • Make a stronger impression at a job interview, user group, or wherever your tech skills may be judged.

Some of the 16 chapters in this 190-page book are updated and expanded versions of essays originally published in TidBITS.

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And now for something that’s largely not work-related—the Apple TV! Our latest book, Take Control of Apple TV, Second Edition, by Josh Centers, provides comprehensive coverage of the fourth-generation Apple TV, including all the tricks with the Siri Remote and details on the just-released tvOS 9.2.

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As you may have already seen, we just kicked off a big 50%-off sale for the next week, with every Take Control book on sale. Since this is a better deal than the standing 30% discount for MUG members, it would be great if you could alert your group to the sale. If you want a URL to send out in Twitter or post on Facebook, use this coupon-loaded link:

http://tid.bl.it/50-percent-off-mar-2016-sale-mug

For email, I’m going to send you another message in just a minute that’s designed to be forwarded to your group mailing list. There’s no need to crop anything out of it other than your username at the bottom—in this case, I figured two messages would be easier for everyone to deal with. If that’s true in general, just let me know at ace@tidbits.com and I can see how well that works in the future too.

Thanks so much for your help—our authors appreciate MUG support immensely!

Cheers… –Adam

 

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Easily create and enter secure passwords on all your devices!

Remembering and entering Web passwords can be easy and secure, thanks to 1Password, the popular password manager from AgileBits. In this book, Joe Kissell brings years of real-world 1Password experience into play to explain not only how to create, edit, and enter Web login data easily, but also how to autofill contact and credit card info when shopping online, audit your passwords and generate better ones, and sync and share your passwords using a variety of techniques—including 1Password for Teams. Joe focuses on 1Password 6 for the Mac, but he also provides details and directions for the iOSWindows, and Android versions of 1Password.

LINK: https://www.takecontrolbooks.com/1password?pt=TCMUG&cp=CPN90219MUG

 

2016 Design Salary Survey

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What skill can you add to your personal design toolkit that could boost your paycheck?

And what skill should you keep off your resume because it could sabotage your compensation?

These are just two important tidbits you’ll learn from our 2016 Design Salary Survey. This eye-opening report was compiled from the results of an anonymous online survey of designers, UX/UI specialists, and other professionals in the design space, most of whom work on web and mobile products or connected devices across a wide range of industries.

This free report arms you with information that can be helpful in job-hunting, salary negotiations, choosing a place to live, or getting a better idea of where you stand in the field of design—and how to move forward in your career.

The O’Reilly 2016 Design Salary Survey report will show you:

  • How years of experience affects wages
  • The most popular tools for UX design
  • The best places to live and work in terms of compensation
  • The skills that will maximize your earning potential
  • Which educational paths translate into higher pay
  • The gender gap in design salaries
  • How to get a salary prediction that shows your place among your peers

And, so we don’t leave you hanging, here are the answers to the two questions at the start of this note.

1  Designers who code—even just a little—earn higher salaries.

2  An academic background in graphic design correlated to lower-than-median salary.

Find out more valuable information, like this, that can help you improve your income potential. Get the 2016 Salary Survey report today.

Enjoy it, with our compliments,

Mary Treseler, Director of Strategic Content, Design